What Will Power Shipping in 2050?

In the KNect365  blog post last year: “12 experts evaluate the shipping industry's potential to go green” we discussed shipping’s potential to meet the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap. 2020 isn’t very far away, so the question arises - what are shipping companies actually doing right now? How many ships are actually using LNG? Are any commercial ships using biofuels, or wind?

Luckily, the answer comes to us from Dr. Nishatabbas Rehmatulla. In a paper published in January 2016, Dr. Rehmatulla and his team at University College London Energy Institute along with IMarEST, RINA and the MEPC surveyed 275 shipping companies representing 5,500 ships (or 20% of the wetbulk, drybulk and container industry). Just 1.5% of shipping companies said they were using LNG, .2% Biofuels, and .1% Solar. None of the companies that responded were using Wind Power, Kites, Sails or Flettner Rotors.

I asked several experts in the industry, including Dr. Rehmatulla, which alternative fuel they thought would see the largest growth by 2050. Will LNG remain on top of the heap – or will the recent highly publicized Norsepower/Maersk Tankers wind propulsion collaboration lead the way for commercial shipping to embrace wind shipping? 

Low Sulfur Fuel in 2020- an overview of the projected maritime energy market

Low Sulfur Fuel in 2020, aka the "Ramsey Report", provides an overview of the projected maritime low sulfur fuel market for 2020, with  a concentration on petroleum fuels.  Projections made by two research consultants are compared to shed light on the uncertain future of this market.

An Alert to the Shipping Industry: a Letter from Kathy Metcalf

In preparation for the United Nations Oceans Conference set for 5-9 June 2017 in New York, a number of preparatory committees and side events are being conducted.  On February 15, 2017, a side event was held at the UN, sponsored jointly by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS),  the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the Government of France.  The event was titled "At the crossroads: Global Shipping Lanes and Whale Conservation". . . 

 

With this summary of the event in mind, the purpose of this email is to alert the shipping industry . . .

Ballast Water Management - Beyond Type Approval

Since September of last year, when the implementation date of the International Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention became clear, all eyes have been focused on the U.S. Type Approval Process.  Ship owners and operators have been concerned, in particular, with the differences between the between the U.S. and International Type approval processes and the potential that BWMS meeting the more stringent U.S. requirements may not be available prior to the entry into force of the International BWM Convention in 2017.

In December 2016, the Coast Guard type approved three BWMSs, and we expect to see more systems submitted for type approval early this year.  

SHIPPING: Indispensable to the World

Shipping affects us all. No matter where you may be in the world, if you look around you, you are almost certain to see something that either has been or will be transported by sea, whether in the form of raw materials, components or the finished article. Yet few people have any idea just how much they rely on shipping. For the vast majority, shipping is out of sight and out of mind. But this does a huge disservice to the industry that, quietly and efficiently, day and night, never pausing and never stopping, keeps the world turning and keeps the people of the world fed, clothed, housed and entertained. This is a story that needs to be told.